Artists

In addition to the four contributors below, we have guest artists from time to time.

Dave Marshall

Dave Marshall

Photographer

Dave Marshall’s main photographic interests are landscape, architecture and vintage motorsports. He travels extensively in the Canadian west and American southwest in an endless quest for the perfect fusion of light and form. Dave’s interest in automotive culture and architecture has led him down the western portion of Route 66 several times, the culmination of these trips being the book “Route 66 a Last Look”.

“I do not see myself as an artist, rather a chronicler of the art, beauty, tragedy and humour that surrounds our everyday lives”.

Robin Read

Robin Read

Photographer

The beauty and ruggedness of the Canadian Rockies and the rolling prairies of Alberta have become a natural landscape subject for Robin Read’s photography. It has provided him with the opportunity to combine his love of the outdoors with his passion for photography. The photographs were taken over a number of years going back to the mid-1980’s and early 1990’s up to the present day and represent a cross section of Alberta’s diverse spaces. Capturing the right light at the right time is all important and he hopes this is reflected in his photographs. All the work is film based and printed using traditional darkroom processes.
Sandra Stahl

Sandra Stahl

Painter

As an Artist, I am strongly inspired by colour, textures, patterns and nature. I love to create unusual angles or interesting and creative perspectives of particular scenes or scenarios that I come across while riding in a car, being out and about in the city or trekking through the country side and combine these with an equally interesting colour palette . There is no doubt that I love nature and the country side, but I can be equally inspired to paint a scene of townhouses that are neatly arranged side-by side in rows as I would be by the majestic Alberta Grain Elevators or little farmhouses out in the prairies; as well as atmospheric landscapes and rolling hills. When starting out, I tend to sketch or have some sort of a plan before I actually start painting on a canvas, but I generally leave things open to change as I progress with my painting – I either add, change colours or take away elements which I previously thought I would include. My paintings develop as I work and this is the fun part of it, nothing is ever set in stone and sometimes it is the seemingly unexpected brush strokes that lead to something rather different and wonderful. I would describe my creative process as ‘a play of brush strokes on canvas’ in and by which layers of paint, colours and different textures emerge to create a lighthearted, whimsical scene or an inspiring viewpoint. It is like the process of painting takes me away to a deeper, fresher and lighter psychological state, an experience which I feel emanates through my work and hence something I would also like to share with the people collecting and viewing my work.